National Parks

We woke to tents shrouded in mist and soaring cliffs catching the first light of dawn – it was magical.

Discover the spectacular landscapes of Wollemi National Park, part of the Greater Blue Mountains World Heritage Area. From scenic canyons, towering cliffs, wild rivers and serene forests, there are ample opportunities to be immersed in the beauty of the largest wilderness area in NSW.

In the southeast of the park, pack a picnic and hike down to the beautiful Colo river for lunch in the dramatic surrounds of one of the state’s longest and most picturesque gorges.

Set up camp by the Wolgan river and head out to explore the historic ruins at Newnes, once the site of an oil shale mining facility, or take the kids to marvel at the luminous occupants of the Glow Worm Tunnel, part of the old railway that once serviced the area. Bushwalkers and rock climbers will thrill at the hikes and climbing opportunities available in this striking, escarpment – bound valley.

Ancient connections

The area that is now Wollemi National Park has held significance to Aboriginal people for at least 12,000 years. Evidence of this connection can be seen throughout the park, including ceremonial grounds, stone arrangements, grinding grooves, scarred trees and rock engravings. There are around 120 known Aboriginal sites in the park and probably many more yet to be discovered. The Darug people have a strong and ongoing cultural association with their traditional lands and waters. They, along with the Wiradjuri, Windradyne, Wanaruah and Darkinjung Local Aboriginal Land Councils and other Aboriginal groups, continue to be involved with Wollemi National Park today.

Geological marvels

Wollemi’s landscape has been sculpted over millennia into a magnificent network of soaring sandstone escarpments, plunging gorges and canyons, winding river valleys and awe-inspiring geological and geomorphological features such as pagoda rock formations, basalt-capped mountains and diatremes. The spectacular Colo gorge and its tributaries form the most extensive sandstone canyon system in eastern Australia. Grab your camera and discover for yourself the breathtaking vistas and natural marvels that make this a World Heritage treasure.

Nature’s haven

It’s little surprise that Wollemi’s spectacular landscape shelters a rich diversity of plants and animals. The rare Wollemi pine – a ‘living fossil’ whose closest relatives thrived some 90 million years ago – was rediscovered here in 1994, and the park protects an incredible array of botanical species and communities, from open eucalypt forest and woodlands including Hawkesbury and grey box, to rainforests and perched swamps. This variety makes it an appealing habitat for eastern grey kangaroos, red-necked wallabies and the elusive brush-tailed rock wallaby, as well as the beautifully marked broad-headed snake, regent honeyeater and glossy black cockatoo. Around 55 species of butterfly have also been recorded.

Outdoor adventure

Pitch a tent at one of Wollemi’s great campgrounds, like the secluded Colo Meroo backpack campground, the car-accessible Coorongooba campground or the dramatically-situated, car-accessible Newnes campground. With your base set up, you’re free to get out and enjoy the park’s fantastic outdoor attractions, be they more relaxed pursuits such as picnicking, canoeing and swimming or something more adventurous like rock climbing, horseriding and hiking.